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Two Worlds - Season 1 - Episode 14
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Source: olaxali
He didn’t know why the woman fixed eyes to the side window. She could be admiring the passing coconut trees that were encroaching into the main road, or she simply didn’t want to catch his gaze. The second was most likely.

The road to Olodi was not very clear, but the billboards guided and saved him asking her for directions. It didn’t seem she wanted to talk or do anything than stare at the out and play with the crucifix at the end of her hung rosary. He needed to make her talk.
“You’re a Catholic?” he asked.
“No.”

No? She was a parishioner of St. Vincent de Paul. Or was supposed to. “Your rosary.”
She bobbed head to it as though ignorant it rounded her neck. “I’m not a Catholic. Not a Christian.”
“You’re not a Christian?”
“I’m not.”
How could she not be a Christian, a Catholic? “I thought I once saw a necklace of St. Vincent de Paul round your neck.” He glanced at her neck for the necklace. It was no more there.
“My parents are parishioners of Vincent de Paul.”

“And you?”
“I’m not.”
How couldn’t she? Christianity fitted her. “You’re a Muslim?”
“No.”
Only three base religions existed in Nigeria. He didn’t want to guess the third, those ones who worshipped carved deities and made living sacrifices to the deities in shrines that had all sort of things, ranging from human skulls to full human skeletons. “Then which are you?”
“None.”
None. That was first he was hearing. Everyone in the country belonged to a religion. “Why none?”
“Religion is a choice.”
“And you choose none?”
“Yes.”

He glanced at her neck, at the rosary’s crucifix resting on her chest, so clean and shimmering for an unchristian person. “Then why wearing a rosary?”


She eyed the crucifix and stroked its white surface with a thumb. “My parents are Christians, so there happen to be many of this in my house. I picked one.”
“You should take it off.”

She looked at him and shifted eyes away. “Why do you say that?”
“It’s an abuse to the Christian faith.” He didn’t want to ask himself if he was in the right position to say that. Nonetheless, it abused the faith.
She pulled off the rosary and la!d it by the gear. “You’re a Christian?”
“I am, and maybe you should consider being one, too.”


“Religion is a choice, and I have no reason to choose any.” Her words formed without any form of hindrance, giving him no reason to believe she might be unsteady about her absurd choice of sticking to no religion. Everyone on earth needed a higher power to survive.

He drove into Olodi and needed some directions, which she gave before he could ask. He followed the routes she pointed at even though he sometimes doubted if some were actual routes cars could follow, and even if some of them were the backyards of unfenced houses that littered around like the dirt on the streets. They bounced to the potholes, and he watched her to ensure her head didn’t hit the car’s roof. It never could have. She was not tall enough. Even so, he took caution.
He diverged into a junction, and as she directed him, they rode further and stopped front of a manicured lawn fronting an emerald bungalow with aluminium roof and leaded windows. Only few houses in the town had that.

She opened the door and stepped out of the car, promising she wouldn’t stay long.
He pondered on if to follow her in or remain glued to the seat. The second. She opened her gate and stepped in, giving him a small view of the compound. The ground had concrete tiles that seared to the falling rays, announcing that the sun was at its peak. Mondays never caught him this late.
She walked out with a phone enclosed in her hand, a Samsung good as the one he offered. She stepped into the car and he started the engine.

“Your place is good. What job do you do?”
“I do small-scale painting.”
Small-scale painting wasn’t enough to get such a place, unless Lagos had changed.
“My parents own the place.” Her voice sprung up. “They left it and headed north.”
It was good she had a decent place to lay head. “Your painting, how small is it?”
“I paint and sell to interested individuals.”
That should be enough to grant her three solid meals.

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